Everything ends badly, or else it wouldn’t end

Vice on an apparently incredibly well-known artist that I clearly have never heard of because I am overworked and a Dad these days:

There’s a stronger parallel to be drawn here, too. After the grunge explosion and the birth of so-called “alternative rock” brought on by Nirvana’s emergence in the early 90s, the rest of the decade’s mainstream rock airwaves were plagued by increasingly same-y sounding “post-grunge” acts that sanded down the depressive bile of their forebears until it sounded smooth, frictionless, and utterly corporate. Purely for analogous purposes, let’s say that M83 is Nirvana (wait, don’t go!), and the Chainsmokers are, for shits and giggles, Vertical Horizon—so far removed from the source material that the resemblance is barely there, but once you become aware of it, the soullessness it represents is impossible to shake.

Hey, I wrote about this phenomenon once, too, although I needed a clip from “Idiocracy” to make my point:

If Operation Ivy is Sears, or some other classic department store, then Blink-182 is CostCo, and the fat guy in this clip is your typical pop-punk band today. Yeah, in theory he’s emulating CostCo, but it’s been so long since that meant anything, he’s really just going through the motions, sort of hoping that by standing there and saying CostCo-related things that he’s successfully honoring his influences. “Welcome to CostCo” is basically “Defend Pop Punk“.

I actually feel better this also happens to genres of music I’m not interested in.

GOP health-care bill: House Republican leaders abruptly pull their rewrite of the nation’s health-care law

GOP health-care bill: House Republican leaders abruptly pull their rewrite of the nation’s health-care law

Trump’s budget targets rural development programs that provide a quiet lifeline

Trump’s budget targets rural development programs that provide a quiet lifeline

White House tries to salvage GOP health-care proposal as criticism mounts

White House tries to salvage GOP health-care proposal as criticism mounts

health insurance in a mine

Here’s the Washington Post on Trump supporters facing the prospect of losing their medical coverage :

“As for the other problems in his life, he has put his hopes in Trump, who came to West Virginia saying he would bring back coal and put miners back to work. When Trump mentioned repealing Obamacare, Clyde wasn’t sure what that might mean for his Medicaid. But if he had a job that provided health insurance, he reasoned, he wouldn’t need Medicaid anyway, so he voted for Trump, along with 74 percent of McDowell County.”

Clyde here is 54 years old, and is currently an unemployed coal mine worker. Personally, I can’t imagine being in that demographic and thinking “a sustainable future scenario is one where I am back in that mine being a profitable asset for a coal company”, but my assumption is that a lot of people in this situation aren’t putting a lot of thought or research into market economics. 

That’s why I wonder if the nostalgia people have for Reagan’s America, or whatever fictional version they have in their head, is for the actual socio-economic climate at the time, or simply an era where they were thirty years younger. That would fix almost all of Clyde’s problems (health, impending financial needs of old age, lack of economic utility in his field of choice), but I don’t think there’s a policy for that. 

Georges St-Pierre Is Back Because The UFC Is Out Of Ideas

Georges St-Pierre Is Back Because The UFC Is Out Of Ideas

Spike Lee on Knicks’ drama: ‘I’ll pack Phil’s bags’

Spike Lee on Knicks’ drama: ‘I’ll pack Phil’s bags’

Why Conservatives Should Applaud—and Liberals Fear—Neil Gorsuch’s Nomination

Why Conservatives Should Applaud—and Liberals Fear—Neil Gorsuch’s Nomination

Trump promised disruption. That’s exactly what he’s delivering.

Trump promised disruption. That’s exactly what he’s delivering.